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How the planets are aligned

This is the mathematical story of how our solar system is organized. Each planet is at a specific distance from the next planet. The average distance between the planets is 1.62 x 10 ^ 9 meters. which is basically equal to (PHI) (1 x 10 ^ 9) meters; or φ x 1000000000 = 1,682,000,000m

The central circle represents the Sun although the size is not proportional.

The CAD program would not allow me to use provided circles and still be able to see the image. In fact, I had a hard time making small circles. This is because I did not know how to use the program correctly at the time.

Just above the Sun at the beginning of the spiral is Mercury. The planets go in order from there.

Sun = Center

Distance from the previous planet —— Distance from the Sun

Mercury = Beginning of the spiral = 1 @ 58 x 10 ^ 9 meters from the Sun.

Venus = second spiral = 1.86 @ 108 x 10 ^ 9 meters from the Sun.

Earth = third spiral = 1.39 @ 149.66 x 10 ^ 9 meters from the Sun.

Mars = quarter spiral = 1.52 @ 226.82 x 10 ^ 9 meters from the Sun.

Asteroid belt = fifth spiral = 1.71 @ 502.66 x 10 ^ 9 meters from the sun.

Jupiter = sixth spiral = 1.71 @ 778.5 x 10 ^ 9 meters from the Sun.

Saturn = 7th spiral = 1.82 @ 1350 x 10 ^ 9 meters from the Sun.

Uranus = eighth in the spiral = 2.01 @ 2880 x 10 ^ 9 meters from the Sun.

Neptune = ninth spiral = 1.56 @ 4500 x 10 ^ 9 meters from the sun.

Mean distance between planets = 1.62 x 10 ^ 9 meters

Our solar system is basically organized using the golden mean φ = (PHI) = 1.618 as a base measure to separate the planets. the spiral is actually a dual spiral consisting of φ and a sequential Fibonacci pattern. The Fibonacci sequence is the male aspect and φ is the female aspect of the spiral.

Starting with Venus we begin to add the sequential distances. We do not include the distance from Mercury because it is the first and second planet in the Fibonacci sequence.

Sun = 1 + Mercury = 1; then Venus = 2 where we start counting all the distances of the planets from the Sun.

Sum of the distance between planets —– Fibonacci and φ ^ x – 1 sequential order.

Mercury = 1; Fib seq. = 1; φ ^ 1 – 1 = .618; difference = .382

Venus = 1.86; Fib seq. = 2; φ ^ 2 – 1 = 1.618; difference = .14; .242

Earth = 3.25; Fib seq. = 3; φ ^ 3 – 1 = 3.24; difference = .25; .01

March = 4.77; Fib seq. = 5; difference = .23

Asteroid belt = 6.48; φ ^ 4 – 1 = 5.85; difference = .63

Jupiter = 8.19; Fib seq. = 8; difference = .19

Saturn = 10; φ ^ 5 – 1 = 10.09; difference = .09

Uranus = 12.01 = φ ^ 5 + 1 = 12.09; difference = .08

Neptune = 13.57; Fib seq. = 13; difference = .57

φ ^ 6 – 1 = 16.94

Fib seq. = 21

φ ^ 7 – 1 = 28.03 = Moon cycle in days; current = 28,077 days

I haven’t done the work to determine where Pluto, the Kipper belt, or the Oort cloud reside in the sequence, but I’m sure they fit very closely, as do the rest of the planets.

Start with the center circle (Sun) and go up 1 unit. From this point we change 90 degrees per planet and mark the position at each point. The first number you see after the names of the planets directly above are the numbers used to trace the points on the spiral.

Continue with the 90 degree rotation of the points and you will find that it ends at about 4.25 revolutions or basically φ ^ 3 revolutions.

This is the true orientation of our solar system. Although the planets move and rarely line up in this exact sequence, the actual distance between them is relative to the plot. Average distance varies based on elliptical orbits, but not much on the cosmic scale.

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